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Easy Steps for Creating a CharacterEdit

Following is the logical list of steps for creating a TAG character:

  1. Determine Race, Class and the Role your Character will fill in the group
  2. Determine your character's stats: strength, agility etc.
  3. Spend your Skill Acquisition Points (SAP)
  4. Calculate skill bonuses: saves, attacks, defense, deception skills, etc.
  5. Calculate Health Points
  6. Calculate Spell Points / Aggression Points
  7. Selecting your spells
  8. Name your Character
  9. Equipping your Character - cloths, weapons, basic supplies and finances

Step One: Race, Class and Role Edit

The decisions for Race, Class and Role are interwoven together. Any race can be any class and play any role in a TAG world, but races and classes are better suited for some roles than others, especially during the lower levels of the game.

Selecting Character Race: Review the Race Description tables and consider the impacts on your character and how you want to play. The GM may limit the races you can play.

Selecting Character Class: Review the Character Class information and consider the impacts to the character's abilities based on the Races and how you want to play.

Decide your Role in the game:

TAG is very much a team based game.  An adventurer could solo through a dungeon or adventure (at the mercy of their GM) but it is extremely important that you discuss this portion of your decision making with your fellow adventurers.

There are many diversities of play styles.  All styles have ways of attacking the enemy, but some are more direct than others. These roles can be balanced within a character as well how he brings two or more skils together.  Also, you can find ways to have almost any character play almost any role.  It may not be as easy and it may take longer to become proficient, but it can be done in the TAG rule system.  These roles are presented for those that are not familiar with RPG styled games:

Melee Damage Focused Edit

This is the style of playing that allows the character to fight in Melee Combat without worry of being easily damaged. Suggested Classes:  Warrior, Paladin, Rogue, Battle Mage, Barbarian

Ranged Damage Focused Edit

This style allows the character to do massive amounts of damage from a distance.  The character playing this style should stay away from any close range combat. These characters are usually squishy, meaning they can be hurt easier by enemy attacks. Suggested Classes:  Mage, Cleric, Mystic, Thief

Tank Focused Edit

It is almost a necessity to have a Tank in your party of adventurers.  The tank doesn’t focus on damaging the enemy; he focuses on taking the damage so the rest of the party doesn’t have to. Suggested Class: Warrior, and with the right spells Warmonger and Paladin,

Support Focused Edit

These are the players that like to stay away from combat, but like to assist their allies with healing, damage reduction skills, inhibiting the enemy’s movement, or increasing the damage output of players.  They find ways to increase group success.  They typically fight as well, but may not do as much damage as other characters.  (This player is not usually the hero… so if your greedy… don’t be support, your team will fail miserably)

Suggested Classes:  Mage, Cleric, Mystic, Thief and with the correct spells other spell casters as well.

Deception Focused Edit

These are characters that like to sneak around... be deceptive… pull tricky moves… the works. Suggested Classes:  Thief, Rogue, Monk, Jester, Hooligan.

Important things to Remember Edit

Remember, that with the abundance of spells and skills in the game you may be able to find ways to play any role with any character class.

Also, regardless of the role always select at least one skill, spell list or combat specialty combination that allows you to do damage. While a character playing a primary role as a support or tank may not have as many options for dealing damage, careful selection of one spell list or weapon skill with a combat specialty can make any class or role a formidable opponent dealing just as much damage as any other character.

Step Two: Character's Stats Edit

By this point you should have selected your Race, Class, and Role. 

All characters have the following stats which define the characters natural attributes and are important to how the character interacts within the game world.

Character Stats Edit

  • Strength - physical strength – Primary stat for Fighters and Barbarians
  • Agility - your reflexes, quickness, nimbleness and dexterity – Primary Stat for Rogues and Thieves
  • Intelligence - IQ, brain power, cleverness and aptitude – Primary Stat for Mage Realm spell casters
  • Wisdom - understanding of the universe and good judgment– Primary Stat for Cleric Realm spell casters
  • Ingenuity – cleaver and ingenious, replacing Intellect or Wisdom in some cases – Primary stat for Engineers
  • Countenance - a characters physical appearance, personality and persuasiveness – Primary stat for Bards
  • Senses - sight, hearing, touch, mental intuition – secondary stat
  • Endurance - fortitude, stamina, and staying power – secondary stat

Determining Character Stat Values: Edit

The GM determines the method for adjusting the stats.  There are two recommended methods:

Dice roll method Edit

  1. The Player will roll 2 sets of 10 with a ten sided die (10D) and write down each set of rolls.
  2. From here cross out the lowest 2 rolls of each group of ten.  (You now have 2 sets of 8)
  3. Choose which set has the highest rolls. These numbers will be used to determine your initial stats.  The higher the better.

This method creates characters with the greatest diversity to start out the game, but it may lead to some player’s character being more powerful or weaker by comparison.

Fixed number method Edit

  1. Don’t roll any dice.  This is the fast and easy method, which levels the playing field for all players’ characters.
  2. Use 10, 10, 8, 8, 6, 6, 4, 4 as your eight numbers to assign to your stats.

This starts characters at about the same place.  No one gets extra good numbers and no one gets really bad numbers that they are depressed about for the next 15 levels. 

Apply the adjustments Edit

Use the Racial Starting Stat table to find the starting stats for your character's race and add one of the 8 numbers you just rolled, or us the 8 fixed numbers, to each of your character’s 8 starting stats listed in the table.  Add the highest numbers to the stats your character will consider most important.

Your character’s stats have now been determined.  Next you will customize your character with skills.

Step Three: Learning Skills with Skill Acquisition Points Edit

Skills are what make your character unique.  Selecting and learning skills is how your character will grow stronger with each level she gains.  The Skills Acquisition Charts contains a list of skills and costs to learn the skill in Skill Acquisition Points (SAP).

You can learn more about individual skills on the Skills Description page.

To spend Skill Acquisition Points you will need to look up skill costs in the Skills Acquisition Charts.

Important Note: This step is one of the most time consuming steps in the character creation process. Work together as a team, talk with your GM or leverage the knowledge of a more experienced player to help you with this process. The first time you do this step will take a while. There are a lot of skills, specialties and spells to review in order to make an informed decision. Take your time and enjoy the process. Good Luck!

Learning skills is done by spending Skill Acquisition Points (SAP).  Characters receive 20 skills acquisition points (SAP) to spend on the skill acquisition charts every time they advance a level.  New characters receive 20 SAP to spend before they enter the game for the first time.  This represents what the character has learned in life prior to becoming an adventurer.

Customization of a character is what makes TAG such a dynamic game.  Unlike most other role playing games and rule sets, TAG is designed to allow characters to be varied and distinct from each other, even for two characters of the same class.   You will likely not find two characters that ever turn out the same. 

Several things within TAG create this world of mass diversity.  Skill Acquisition approach, the ability for every class to learn every skill, customized combat expertise skills, and over 1700 spells are some of the most obvious examples for this diversity of characters.  Most important, there are no skills and no spells that cannot be learned by any character class, if they are willing to expend the time and energy to learn.  And, time and energy to learn skills in the game is represented by Skill Acquisition Points.

You receive 20 SAP to start out at level one and every level you advance you gain 20 more points to spend.

Skill Acquisition Points (SAP) Edit

New characters receive 20 SAP to spend before they enter the game for the first time.  Characters also receive 20 skills acquisition points (SAP) to spend on the skill acquisition charts every time they advance a level. 

When using the Skill Acquisition tables, the box at the intersection of the class and the skill provides the cost of the skill per level in SAPs and the number of levels that can be purchased each time the character advances a level. 

  • A single number, such as a 4, means that that character class type can purchase 1 level of that skill each time the character advances a level: a Cleric can purchase 1 level of the Traps skill at the cost of 4 SAPs. 
  • Two numbers, such as 1/3, means that that character can purchase 2 levels of that skill each time the character advances a level, the first one costs 1 SAP and the second level of that skill costs 3 SAPs.  An example of that would be a Thief purchasing the Traps skill. 
  • Finally, a number followed by an * means that the character class can buy as many levels of that skill per level of the character as they can afford.  An example of that would be the Warrior purchasing Armor Maneuver; in the intersecting box you see 1*, which means that the Warrior can use all of his SAPs to buy 20 levels of that skill, if he wants to do that.

Using the above rules you will spend your 20 SAP points to learn, or purchase, your skills, thus customizing your character. 

Things to consider when spending your SAP points Edit

·         Most characters are going to want a way to attack an enemy with either a melee or ranged attack like a bow, or sling.  Some types of characters will want to learn multiple weapon skills.

·         Spell casters need to carefully decide how many points to spend learning spells and how many points to spend on magic related skills that improve their spell casting.

·         Care should be taken to select the Magical Realm and spell lists.  Your first selection dictates the cost of those spells for the rest of the character's life.  This sets your specialty.

·         Even a spell caster may want to learn a melee or range weapon.

Spending Skill Points Edit

When using the Skill Acquisition tables, the box at the intersection of the class and the skill provides the cost of the skill per level in SAPs and the number of levels that can be purchased each time the character advances a level. 

·         A single number, such as a 4, means that that character type can purchase 1 level of that skill each time the character advances a level: a Cleric can purchase 1 level of the Traps skill at the cost of 4 SAPs. 

·         Two numbers, such as 1/3, means that that character can purchase 2 levels of that skill each time the character advances a level, the first one costs 1 SAP and the second level of that skill costs 3 SAPs.  An example of that would be a Thief purchasing the Traps skill. 

·         Finally, a number followed by an * means that the character class can buy as many levels of that skill per level of the character as they can afford.  An example of that would be the Warrior purchasing Armor Maneuver; in the intersecting box you see 1*, which means that the Warrior can use all of his SAPs to buy 20 levels of that skill, if he wants to do that.

To learn more about individual skills and look at Skills Acquisition Charts, follow this link: http://tag.wikia.com/wiki/Skills

Step Four: Calculate Skill Bonuses Edit

In the previous step you used SAP to buy skills. Each level of a skill increases your ability (chance) to perform that skill while adventuring or in combat. There are some expectations but those will be detailed in the skill description. In general as your character gains higher levels and spends SAP on skills they gain more skill levels.

A skill bonus is a combination of factors that all come together to determine how good a character is with the skill.  The higher the total skill bonus the higher chance the character has with that skill.

The following chart outlines the bonuses you gain for skill levels:

Skill Levels Bonus Chart Edit

Skill Levels

Bonus Per level

Examples

1-10

+5

10th level bonus +50

11-20

+2

20th level bonus +70

21 and above

+1

30th level bonus +80

Steps for calculating your skill bonuses Edit

  1. Determine stat bonuses for each stat (see the stat bonus section below)
  2. Determine bonus for skill level from the Skill Level Bonus Chart (see skill bonus chart above)
  3. Determine if the character has any class bonuses to apply to the skill
  4. Skill bonus is the stat bonus + the skill level bonus + class specific bonuses

Stat Bonus Edit

Start by calculating your stat bonus for each of your character's stats.  To calculate a stat bonus find the Stat's score on the Stat Bonus Chart under the Stat column and the number to the right in the Bonus column is the stat bonus for that stat.  You will use this chart for determining the stat bonus of all your stats.  Enter this bonus number into the Stat Bonus column beside the appropriate Stat on your Character Sheet.

Stat Bonus Chart Edit

Stat

Bonus

Stat

Bonus

Stat

Bonus

1-2

-25

51-52

1

101-102

26

3-4

-24

53-54

2

103-104

27

5-6

-23

55-56

3

105-106

28

7-8

-22

57-58

4

107-108

29

9-10

-21

59-60

5

109-110

30

11-12

-20

61-62

6

111-112

30

13-14

-19

63-64

7

113-114

31

15-16

-18

65-66

8

115-116

31

17-18

-17

67-68

9

117-118

32

19-20

-16

69-70

10

119-120

32

21-22

-15

71-72

11

121-122

33

23-24

-14

73-74

12

123-124

33

25-26

-13

75-76

13

125-126

34

27-28

-12

77-78

14

127-128

34

29-30

-11

79-80

15

129-130

35

31-32

-10

81-82

16

131-132

35

33-34

-9

83-84

17

133-134

36

35-36

-8

85-86

18

135-136

36

37-38

-7

87-88

19

137-138

37

39-40

-6

89-90

20

139-140

37

41-42

-5

91-92

21

141-142

38

43-44

-4

93-94

22

143-144

38

45-46

-3

95-96

23

145-146

39

47-48

-2

97-98

24

147-148

39

49-50

-1

99-100

25

151-up

40

Class Specific Bonus Edit

Each character class has bonuses specific to their class. Some of these class bonuses may provide a bonus on some skills.

Listed below are bonuses that are unique to each class.

Warriors gain +2 hit points per Hit Point skill level, above the +10 given to everyone else.

Warriors gain +1 per character level attack bonus with all weapon attacks.

Rogues gain +1 sneak, +1 sneak attack and +1 attack bonus per each character level, and +1 for each 5 character levels for the other deceptions skills.

Thieves gain +1 to all deception skills per character level.

Barbarians gain +1 to attack bonus per character level, +1 to damage for each 5 character levels for melee weapons, and +1 attack bonus for each 5 character levels for off-hand weapons.

Jesters gain +1 per 5 character levels for deception skills.

Monks gain +1 per 5 character levels for deception skills.

Paladins and Battle Mages gain +1 per 5 character levels to attack bonus with all weapon attacks.

Clerics and Mages gain +1 extra spell points per character level for their primary realm, which are added into the spell points after they are calculated.

Mystics gain +1 extra spell points per character level for each realm, which are added into the spell points after they are calculated.

Warmonger Uses Ingenuity Stat for calculating Spell Points for the realm selected and Mythic Engineering Spells, rather than Wisdom or Intellect.   Uses Ingenuity Stat for calculating Stat Bonus for Melee and Ranged attacks, rather than strength, agility or reflexes.

Hooligan Uses Ingenuity Stat for calculating Spell Points for the realm selected and Mythic Engineering Spells, rather than Wisdom or Intellect.   Uses Ingenuity Stat for calculating Stat Bonus for Deception skills, rather than strength, agility or reflexes, intellect, etc.

Wizard Uses Ingenuity Stat for calculating Spell Points for the Mage or Cleric realm rather than Intellect or Wisdom depending on which realm the Wizard chooses, and Mythic Engineering spells will use that same Spell Point pool.  Uses Ingenuity Stat for calculating Stat Bonus for all Skills using Intellect or Wisdom.  Ingenuity replaces Intellect.

Bard +1 per character level for Language, Bartering skills and Observation.  Uses countenance Stat for calculating Spell Points for the realm selected and Bard spells.

All classes can chose one Adventuring skill (excluding armor maneuver) or one Secondary skill to gain +1 for each character level.  This choice is made during character creation.

Step Five: Calculate Health Points Edit

Health Points represent how many points of damage a character can take before being rendered unconscious due to bodily physical trauma.  Your character's endurance plays a large role in determining how much health, or Hit Points, you have.

The number of Health Points a character has is calculated by taking Endurance + (Endurance Stat Bonus x character level) + (Health Point skill level x 10), unless you are a warrior who gain 12 hit points per Health Point skill level.  Warriors use the following formula:  Endurance + (Endurance State Bonus x character level) + (Health Point skill level x 12).  Note that the only difference in the formula is the last number.

The Endurance Stat Bonus is found on the Stat Bonus Chart.  Find the Endurance score on the Stat Bonus Chart under the Stats column and the number to the right in the Bonus column is the stat bonus for endurance.  You will use this chart (located in the section above title Step Four: Calculate Skill Bonuses) for determining the stat bonus of all stats in the game. 

Warrior class Health Point formula:  Edit

Endurance + (Endurance State Bonus x character level) + (Health Point skill level x 12)

Non-Warrior class Health Point formula: Edit

Endurance + (Endurance State Bonus x character level) + (Health Point skill level x 10)

Health Point formula examples: Edit

A level 7 warrior with 14 levels of Health Point skill and an endurance of 93 would calculate Health Points in this way:  93+(22x7) + (14x12) = 415 health points

 A level 7 barbarian with 5 levels of Health Point skill and an endurance of 87 would calculate Health Points in this way: 87+(19x7)+(5x10)=270 health points

You will find that a warrior can gain health points faster than any other class in the game.  While a Barbarian and spell casters gain hit points at a much lower rate because of skill acquisition costs.

Step Six: Calculate Spell Points / Aggression Points Edit

Spell points are used to cast spells.  The level of the spell dictates how many spell points are required to cast that spell.  So, how do you know how many spell points you have?

The number of spell points a character has is calculated by taking the (Character's level + Spell Points skill level) x Spell Point Bonus Spell points are recalculated each level using this formula.  This formula is repeated for each realm of magic.  Therefore, Spell Point Skill levels must be purchased individually for each realm of magic.

Character's level: this is character's current level.

Spell Points skill level: this is how many total levels of the "Spell Points" skill the character has purchased (for each realm) from the Skills Acquisition Chart as they have leveled their character up.

Spell Point Bonus: this is determined by finding the character's stat on the Spell Point Bonus Chart and the corresponding spell points.

Example:  A 10th level Mage, who has purchased a total of 12 levels of Spell Points skill levels, and has an Intelligence Stat of 96 has 198 spell points: (10+12)x9=198.  

Spell Point and Aggression Point Bonus Chart

Stat

Points

Stat

Points

65-69

1

108-111

12

70-72

1

112-115

12

73-75

2

116-119

13

76-78

3

120-123

13

79-81

4

124-127

14

82-84

5

128-131

14

85-87

6

132-135

15

88-90

7

136-139

15

91-93

8

140-143

16

94-96

9

144-147

16

97-99

10

148-151

17

100-103

11

152-160

17

104-107

11

161-170

18

Spell Points = (Character's level + Spell Points skill level) x Spell Point Bonus.

Aggression Points = (Character's level + Aggression Points skill level) x Aggression Point Bonus

As you adventure you will expend Spell and Aggression points. Details on how to regenerate those points can be found here on the Regeneration of Spell and Aggresion Points page.

Step Seven: Selecting Spells and/or Combat Specialties Edit

Selecting spells and combat specialties is a matter of preference, but there are some good guidelines.

  • Focus in early levels on the spells from your

character’s realm of expertise.  This will allow you to gain more spells quicker because spells form your realm are less expensive to learn.

  • Mage’s, Battle Mage’s, and Jester’s primary

realm is the mage realm.  They purchase all spells from the cleric realm at the cost in the “other lists” category. 

  • Cleric’s, Paladin’s and Monk’s primary realm is

the cleric realm.  They purchase all spells from the mage realm at the cost in the “other lists” category. 

  • Mystic’s can chose spells from either realm

using the Spell Discipline costs Choice.  They do need to choose which lists from each realm to assign the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th column costs.

  • Warriors, Barbarians, Thieves and Rogues have no

primary spell realm, but they can purchase combat specialties at very low costs.  Their spell lists are all costly.

  • Warmongers, Hooligans and Wizards always use Engineering as their 1st spell discipline and must focus on either mage or cleric realm lists for their other spell disciplines.

Just have fun and customize your character however you want.  That is what makes the game unique.

Selecting spells and combat specialties can be complicated. For additional information visit the following pages:

Spells Skills:

Spell Lists:

Combat Specialties are critical for creating an effective non-spell user character. You will find your non-spell user character lacking the ability to deal higher damage and provide utility in combat without combat specialties. It is highly recommended that a non-spell user character select a Combat Specialty that focuses on dealing damage such as Combat Expertise, Combat Ranged Attacks or Combat Unarmed.

Step Eight: Name Your Character Edit

There are no real rules for naming your character, but your GM may enforce creative rules, or may require that he provide final approval on character names. Check with your GM.

Step Nine: Equip Your Character Edit

Characters are equipped at the start of the game in a couple of possible ways. The GM may provide you a list of items you can start with, or provide you with gold and silver and a price list. The GM may start you with nothing more than the cloths on your back and through the adventures begin to equip you by finding items.

Typically it is best that characters start with cloths, weapon, backpack and basic survival supplies. Check with your GM.

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